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The Profession of Faith

43

157

Faith is

certain.

It is more certain than all human knowl-

edge because it is founded on the very word of God who cannot

lie. To be sure, revealed truths can seem obscure to human reason

and experience, but “the certainty that the divine light gives is

greater than that which the light of natural reason gives.”

31

“Ten

thousand difficulties do not make one doubt.”

32

158

“Faith

seeks understanding

”:

33

it is intrinsic to faith that a

believer desires to know better the One in whom he has put his

faith and to understand better what He has revealed; a more

penetrating knowledge will in turn call forth a greater faith, in-

creasingly set afire by love. The grace of faith opens “the eyes of

your hearts”

34

to a lively understanding of the contents of Revela-

tion: that is, of the totality of God’s plan and the mysteries of faith,

of their connection with each other and with Christ, the center of

the revealed mystery. “The same Holy Spirit constantly perfects

faith by his gifts, so that Revelation may be more and more pro-

foundly understood.”

35

In the words of St. Augustine, “I believe,

in order to understand; and I understand, the better to believe.”

36

159

Faith and science:

“Though faith is above reason, there can

never be any real discrepancy between faith and reason. Since the

same God who reveals mysteries and infuses faith has bestowed

the light of reason on the human mind, God cannot deny himself,

nor can truth ever contradict truth.”

37

“Consequently, methodical

research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in

a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can

never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and

the things of faith derive from the same God. The humble and

persevering investigator of the secrets of nature is being led, as it

were, by the hand of God in spite of himself, for it is God, the

conserver of all things, who made them what they are.”

38

31 St. Thomas Aquinas,

STh

II-II, 171, 5, obj. 3.

32 John Henry Cardinal Newman,

Apologia pro vita sua

(London: Longman,

1878), 239.

33 St. Anselm,

Prosl. prooem.:

PL 153, 225A.

34

Eph

1:18.

35

DV

5.

36 St. Augustine,

Sermo

43, 7, 9: PL 38, 257-258.

37

Dei Filius

4: DS 3017.

38

GS

36 § 1.

2088

2705

1827

90

2518

283

2293