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The Profession of Faith

75

286

Human intelligence is surely already capable of finding a

response to the question of origins. The existence of God the

Creator can be known with certainty through his works, by the

light of human reason,

122

even if this knowledge is often obscured

and disfigured by error. This is why faith comes to confirm and

enlighten reason in the correct understanding of this truth: “By

faith we understand that the world was created by the word of

God, so that what is seen was made out of things which do not

appear.”

123

287

The truth about creation is so important for all of human

life that God in his tenderness wanted to reveal to his People

everything that is salutary to know on the subject. Beyond the

natural knowledge that every man can have of the Creator,

124

God

progressively revealed to Israel the mystery of creation. He who

chose the patriarchs, who brought Israel out of Egypt, and who by

choosing Israel created and formed it, this same God reveals himself

as theOne towhombelong all the peoples of the earth, and thewhole

earth itself; he is the One who alone “made heaven and earth.”

125

288

Thus the revelation of creation is inseparable from the

revelation and forging of the covenant of the one God with his

People. Creation is revealed as the first step toward this covenant,

the first and universal witness to God’s all-powerful love.

126

And

so, the truth of creation is also expressed with growing vigor in

themessage of the prophets, the prayer of the psalms and the liturgy,

and in the wisdom sayings of the Chosen People.

127

289

Among all the Scriptural texts about creation, the first

three chapters of Genesis occupy a unique place. From a literary

standpoint these texts may have had diverse sources. The inspired

authors have placed them at the beginning of Scripture to express

in their solemn language the truths of creation—its origin and its

end in God, its order and goodness, the vocation of man, and finally

the drama of sin and the hope of salvation. Read in the light of

Christ, within the unity of Sacred Scripture and in the living

Tradition of the Church, these texts remain the principal source for

catechesis on the mysteries of the “beginning”: creation, fall, and

promise of salvation.

122 Cf. Vatican Council I, can. 2 § 1: DS 3026.

123

Heb

11:3.

124 Cf.

Acts

17:24-29;

Rom

1:19-20.

125 Cf.

Isa

43:1;

Ps

115:15; 124:8; 134:3.

126 Cf.

Gen

15:5;

Jer

33:19-26.

127 Cf.

Isa

44:24;

Ps

104;

Prov

8:22-31.

32

37

107

280, 2569

390

111