Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  83 / 904 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 83 / 904 Next Page
Page Background

The Profession of Faith

83

by the sins of all men—God, by his grace that “abounded all the

more,”

179

brought the greatest of goods: the glorification of Christ

and our redemption. But for all that, evil never becomes a good.

313

“We know that in everything God works for good for those

who love him.”

180

The constant witness of the saints confirms this

truth:

St. Catherine of Siena said to “those who are scandalized and

rebel against what happens to them”: “Everything comes

from love, all is ordained for the salvation of man, God does

nothing without this goal in mind.”

181

St. Thomas More, shortly before his martyrdom, consoled

his daughter: “Nothing can come but that that God wills.

And I make me very sure that whatsoever that be, seem it

never so bad in sight, it shall indeed be the best.”

182

Dame Julian of Norwich: “Here I was taught by the grace of

God that I should steadfastly keep me in the faith . . . and

that at the same time I should takemy stand on and earnestly

believe in what our Lord shewed in this time—that ‘all

manner [of] thing shall be well.’”

183

314

We firmly believe that God is master of the world and of

its history. But the ways of his providence are often unknown to

us. Only at the end, when our partial knowledge ceases, when we

see God “face to face,”

184

will we fully know the ways by which—

even through the dramas of evil and sin—God has guided his

creation to that definitive sabbath rest

185

for which he created

heaven and earth.

IN BRIEF

315

In the creation of the world and of man, God gave the

first and universal witness to his almighty love and his

wisdom, the first proclamation of the “plan of his

loving goodness,” which finds its goal in the new

creation in Christ.

179 Cf.

Rom

5:20.

180 Rom 8:28.

181 St. Catherine of Siena,

Dialogue on Providence,

ch. IV, 138.

182

The Correspondence of Sir Thomas More,

ed. Elizabeth F. Rogers (Princeton:

Princeton University Press, 1947), letter 206, lines 661-663.

183 Julian of Norwich,

The Revelations of Divine Love,

tr. James Walshe, SJ

(London: 1961), ch. 32, 99-100.

184

1 Cor

13:12.

185 Cf.

Gen

2:2.

1994

227

1040

2550