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Glossary

869

-C-

CALUMNY:

A false statement

which harms the reputation of

others and gives occasion for

false judgments concerning them

(2477).

CANON LAW:

The rules (canons

or laws) which provide the norms

for good order in the visible

society of the Church. Those

canon laws that apply universally

are contained in the Codes of

Canon Law. The most recent Code

of Canon Law was promulgated

in 1983 for the Latin (Western)

Church and in 1991 for the Eastern

Church (

The Code of Canons of the

Eastern Churches

).

CANON OF THE MASS:

The

central part of the Mass, also

known as the Eucharistic Prayer

or “anaphora,” which contains

the prayer of thanksgiving and

consecration (1352).

CANON OF SCRIPTURE:

The

Church’s complete list of sacred

books of the Bible (120).

CANONIZATION:

The solemn

declaration by the Pope that a

deceased member of the faithful

may be proposed as a model

and intercessor to the Christian

faithful and venerated as a saint

on the basis of the fact that the

person lived a life of heroic virtue

or remained faithful to God

through martyrdom (828; cf. 957).

CAPITAL SINS:

Sins which

engender other sins and vices.

They are traditionally numbered

as seven: pride, covetousness,

envy, anger, gluttony, lust, and

sloth (1866).

CARDINAL VIRTUES:

Four

pivotal human virtues (from the

Latin

cardo,

“pivot”): prudence,

justice, fortitude, and temperance.

The human virtues are stable

dispositions of the intellect and

will that govern our acts, order

our passions, and guide our

conduct in accordance with reason

and faith (1805, 1834).

CATECHESIS:

An education

of children, young people, and

adults in the faith of the Church

through the teaching of Christian

doctrine in an organic and

systematic way to make them

disciples of Jesus Christ. Those

who perform the ministry of

catechesis in the Church are called

“catechists” (5, 426-427).

CATECHISM:

A popular

summary or compendium of

Catholic doctrine about faith and

morals and designed for use in

catechists (11).

CATECHUMEN:

A person who

is preparing for Baptism. The

catechumenate

is the formation of

these catechumens in preparation

for their Christian Initiation, and

aims at bringing their conversion

and their faith to maturity

within the ecclesial community

(1248). The candidates are

anointed with

oil of catechumens

by which they are strengthened

in their conversion from sin and

renunciation of Satan (1237).

CATHEDRAL:

The official

church of the bishop of a diocese.

The Greek word

cathedra

means

chair or throne; the bishop’s

“chair” symbolizes his teaching

and governing authority, and is

located in the principal church or

“cathedral” of the local diocese

of which he is the chief pastor (cf.

1572).