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The Profession of Faith

93

nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being.”

229

Man,

whole and entire, is therefore

willed

by God.

363

In Sacred Scripture the term “soul” often refers to human

life

or the entire human

person.

230

But “soul” also refers to the

innermost aspect of man, that which is of greatest value in him,

231

that by which he is most especially in God’s image: “soul” signifies

the

spiritual principle

in man.

364

The human body shares in the dignity of “the image of

God”: it is a human body precisely because it is animated by a

spiritual soul, and it is the whole human person that is intended to

become, in the body of Christ, a temple of the Spirit:

232

Man, though made of body and soul, is a unity. Through his

very bodily condition he sums up in himself the elements of

the material world. Through him they are thus brought to

their highest perfection and can raise their voice in praise

freely given to the Creator. For this reason man may not

despise his bodily life. Rather he is obliged to regard his body

as good and to hold it in honor since God has created it and

will raise it up on the last day.

233

365

The unity of soul and body is so profound that one has to

consider the soul to be the “form” of the body:

234

i.e., it is because

of its spiritual soul that the body made of matter becomes a living,

human body; spirit and matter, in man, are not two natures united,

but rather their union forms a single nature.

366

The Church teaches that every spiritual soul is created

immediately by God—it is not “produced” by the parents—and

also that it is immortal: it does not perish when it separates from

the body at death, and it will be reunited with the body at the final

Resurrection.

235

367

Sometimes the soul is distinguished from the spirit: St. Paul

for instance prays that God may sanctify his people “wholly,” with

“spirit and soul and body” kept sound and blameless at the Lord’s

coming.

236

The Church teaches that this distinction does not intro-

duce a duality into the soul.

237

“Spirit” signifies that from creation

229

Gen

2:7.

230 Cf.

Mt

16:25-26;

Jn

15:13;

Acts

2:41.

231 Cf.

Mt

10:28; 26:38;

Jn

12:27;

2 Macc

6:30.

232 Cf. 1

Cor

6:19-20; 15:44-45.

233

GS

14 § 1; cf.

Dan

3:57-80.

234 Cf. Council of Vienne (1312): DS 902.

235 Cf. Pius XII,

Humani Generis:

DS 3896; Paul VI,

CPG

§ 8; Lateran Council V

(1513): DS 1440.

236

1 Thess

5:23.

237 Cf. Council of Constantinople IV (870): DS 657.

1703

1004

2289

1005

997

2083